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Bestselling leadership expert and author Chester Elton keynotes at RPI Conference in Nashville

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, March 13, 2018

Real solutions on managing culture change, driving innovation, and leading a multi-generational workforce.

#1 New York Times, USA Today and Wall Street Journal bestsellers All In and The Carrot Principle.

For decades, when your parents wanted you to eat your vegetables, we’ve heard the idea that carrots are good for your vision. Chester Elton is a man renowned for his business visions, which may be one of the reasons he and a business partner have dubbed themselves the Carrot Guys.

Elton, who will be one of the keynote speakers at the 2018 RPI Annual Conference, began his journey as an author and orator two decades ago. Along with writing partner Adrian Gostick, Elton was doing consulting work on employee engagement and recognition. He first hit on the idea of taking what they were learning through their work and making a book out of it. Both men sensed a need for a “bible of recognition and engagement.”

Their biggest challenge was a lack of knowledge about how to get a book published. On their website, Elton and Gostick recall cold-calling a local publishing whose specialty was cookbooks and do-it-yourself manuals.

With a publishing contract that the men signed on a picnic table outside an old barn that had been converted into an office, they wrote and wrote and re-wrote until “Managing With Carrots” was complete. The book came out in 1999 and was a success, selling 40,000 copies in its first year. Since then the duo has written four more books, with increasing levels of success, and have become sought-after experts on workplace dynamics and employee engagement. They’ve moved from a niche publisher to giant Simon & Schuster, and note with some pride that their written works have been translated into 20 languages and are popular on every continent except Antarctica.

In 2010 Elton and Gostick also founded their own consulting and training company, The Culture Works, which focuses on employee engagement, culture and leadership strategies with some of the world’s most renowned corporate names.

Elton, along with renowned author David Sturt, will be the featured speakers at the 2018 RPI Conference, which kicks off April 29 in Nashville, Tenn. Registration for the three-day conference, which includes CRP courses and Recognition Fundamentals is now available here.

Tags:  2018 RPI Conference  employee recognition  Nashville conference 

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Microsoft® a worldwide leader in employee recognition efforts

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Wednesday, March 7, 2018
Debra Garcia

The chances are, if you're reading this on a computer, Microsoft® has played some role in that effort.The Seattle-based computer software giant is renowned not just for its role in worldwide information technology, but for making Bill Gates one of the best-known humans on the planet. As RPI member Microsoft® Program Manager Debra Garcia shares, Microsoft also makes an impressive investment in ensuring their best employees know they are valued.

"The overall mission of the Microsoft® Rewards and Recognition program is to honor employees through world-class award programs. The purpose is to motivate exceptional performance and collaboration to support and advance the business. The objective is to ensure consistency and equity across segment/geography, enable regional variation and complement existing compensation strategies." says Debra.

Microsoft® Champion Award Program

The Microsoft® Champion Award program recognizes individuals and teams who are competing with a growth mindset, winning transformational deals as One Microsoft®, and focusing on customer and partner obsession. The program supports over 53,000 worldwide sales, marketing and services employees.

Informal recognition includes:

  • E-medallions available for LinkedIn and Outlook signature profiles.
  • Thrive Kudos – internal Microsoft® tool that can be used by any employee to send congratulatory emails to individual winners and copying their manager. The feedback is embedded into the employee's personal site which can be viewed by peers, management, etc.
  • Yammer Praise – an employee can send an internal praise to an award winner. A copy of the email is sent to the recipient's manager and added to their Yammer feed and any other Yammer feeds that are tagged.
  • Highlight and recognize winners at local team meetings.
  • PowerPoint presentations of winners with their achievements, organization, job title, etc. – local award managers can export a custom PPT from the winner showcase and display on office video screens, at team meetings, and more.

Formal recognition includes:

  • A winner announcement email from leadership
  • An executive letter portfolio
  • An invitation to the annual winner celebration reception
  • Award site and winner showcase

Nomination Tool

  • To track nominations and manage the selection process, Microsoft® created a nomination tool using an Azure database backend with winner data from 2004 to current.
  • The tool consists of a nomination form and user dashboards to manage the different user workflows - nominator, reviewer, award manager and program manager. 
  • Anyone at Microsoft® can nominate individuals or teams. 
  • Upon submission, the tool sends an email from the Champion award email alias to the nominee's direct manager with a request to approve or decline the nomination. If declined, the manager must provide a brief explanation. If approved, the nomination continues to move up the management chain until it reaches the final decision maker. At that time, a winner selection committee votes on the nominations and the award manager marks the final winners in the tool.
  • There is rich reporting via Word and Excel.

As one would expect from one of the world's foremost names in communication technology, Microsoft's recognition content is structured for clear and concise messaging, aligned with key company objectives and consistent across all communication platforms. To ensure messaging and branding are consistent, email templates are created for executive and quarterly announcements. The use of templates makes it easy and efficient for award managers to simply add in winners and personalize from the executives prior to sending.

For more information about Microsoft's mission to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more please visit their website:

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With Effort and Creativity, Every Day Can Be Employee Appreciation Day

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Thursday, February 15, 2018
Updated: Tuesday, February 13, 2018
Untitled Document

The calendar tells us that Friday, March 2, is 2018’s version of international Employee Appreciation Day. And despite the recent backflips in the stock market, the current economic situation in most of the working world means that experienced, talented employees are more valuable than ever. That means that recognition efforts like those Employee Appreciation Day encourages need to be undertaken once a week, if not once a day, rather than once a year, in the best workplaces.

More and more companies large and small are focusing time and resources to develop an employee recognition strategy designed to ensure that staff feel valued.

Recognition experts stress that this annual event is not and was not ever meant as a one-time celebration, but as a way to acknowledge a year-round culture of appreciation within companies and organizations that makes every day an occasion to recognize good work and encourage employees. More and more member organizations look at Employee Appreciation Day as a chance to be creative and spotlight the many efforts to recognize good work.”

Recognition efforts range in scope from simple events like a root beer float bar at work all the way to elaborate incentives like travel and fiscal rewards. Successful companies like Disney, Southwest Airlines, Cleveland Clinic and others routinely partake in these efforts based on strategy, and the results are clear to see.

Ensuring employees feel valued has been shown to boost productivity and pay dividends for businesses and organizations. Detailed in a RPI webinar, among the many ideas that experts offer for employee recognition activities are:

Food – Everyone loves free food, be it a simple snack, a sweet treat, or a full meal, and there’s something special about an employee being served a meal by their supervisor that reinforces the notion of value and recognition. Everything from food truck appearances to ice cream socials are encouraged as a way to recognize employees through food.

Team activities – Getting out of the office is imperative to the mental health of employees; even if it’s just to the parking lot for a group stretch.  Team activities can be a valuable way to recognize employees and foster a team spirit among members of your organization. Make the office feel different for a day. Some workplaces practice theme days, where workers dress in the colors of their favorite sports team, or emulate their favorite superhero. Games like Jenga contests or a video game setup can bring a spirit of friendly competition to the workplace as well.

Wellness – Some workplaces provide healthy snacks or energy-boosting foods to give employees a needed jumpstart, especially in the afternoons. A popular wellness activity is to bring in massage professionals to provide back and neck rubs.

Other ideas:

  • Create a workplace cookbook, with each employee contributing their favorite recipe, and each of them getting a “book” featuring all of the foods. 
  • Remember off-site and “virtual” employees and find ways to include them, so they feel as recognized and valued as on-site employees.
  • Whatever you do, start small and build gradually, with more activities and edibles as the employee recognition culture grows within your organization.

For other webinars and a wealth of information on Recognition Day, please view RPI resources.

Tags:  employee appreciation 

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How to Create Your Recognition Strategy

Posted By RPI, Tuesday, February 13, 2018
Untitled Document
  1. Strategy first. A sustainable effective recognition program starts with strategy that includes management buy-in and a strong communication strategy.
  2. Think “objectives.” Your written recognition strategy should articulate the philosophy and objectives for all recognition practices, including day-to-day, informal, and formal recognition programs.
  3. Provide clarity. Your recognition strategy provides purpose and direction for how employee recognition encourages and rewards specific employee behaviors that advance the organization’s goals and objectives.
  4. Connect to culture. All recognition activities should be aligned with the mission and culture of the organization.
  5. Mix it up. A successful program includes intangible recognition (verbal and/or written praise), awards (cash or tangible items), and celebrations (planned or spontaneous events). Intangible recognition can be a certificate or other token of appreciation. Celebrations can be an informal team lunch or an organization-wide event.
  6. Reinforce. Reinforce. Reinforce. Successful recognition programs use a variety of motivational tools and communication methods to maximize opportunities to positively reinforce behavior that is consistent with the organization’s goals and values.
  7. Draw on the 7 Best Practice Standards. Base all of your recognition programs on the RPI 7 Best Practices® () and learn more about “real world” recognition strategies here.

RPI – We Make Thanks Matter!

Tags:  recognition strategy 

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Standard Success Stories: Kforce Recognition Strategy

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, January 30, 2018
Updated: Monday, January 29, 2018
Untitled Document

Note: RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards are the cornerstone of successful employee recognition and rewards programs. In 2018, we are taking a closer look at each of the seven standards and RPI members who have been recognized for their practice of those standards. In the first installment, we take a look at Recognition Strategy, and the award-winning way that Kforce practices this standard. The RPI Best Practice Awards are now open for nominations through February 1, 2018.

Kforce, a professional staffing firm based in Tampa, Florida, with more than 60 offices and 2,000 employees, was honored as Best in Class for Recognition Strategy in 2016 by RPI.

Recognition at Kforce is real. So real that they has an entire department dedicated to strategizing, implementing and evaluating recognition programs, contests, events and rewards. It’s all spelled out right in the Kforce Recognition and Engagement Mission Statement:

We want all Kforcers to feel recognized, inspired and valued. We will celebrate and share the Kforce culture of appreciation and performance (it’s what sets us apart).  By doing this, we create a strong, united and engaged Kforce Family.

Known as “Kforcers,” the company’s people have created a culture of recognition by constantly celebrating Great Results in a truly unique and informal fashion. Each office knows the Kforce art of celebration and recognition.

Day-to-day recognition is easy to see at Kforce. Their digital Snapshot feature illustrates this culture of recognition in real time. Associates simply submit a photo and caption that showcases the Kforce recognition culture and it will be posted front and center on their intranet. Hats Off is another informal example that happens all day, every day. This is a digital, peer-to-peer recognition program that’s also on their intranet and is accessible to everyone.  Kforcers are encouraged to make spontaneous recognition posts about their coworkers and partners, then the post is published on the intranet for all to see. Managers receive an email notifying them of their associates’ good deed.

Performance and milestone reports help fuel informal recognition and celebrations. Kforce has numerous ranking reports that are emailed on a monthly and quarterly basis to a select audience. These reports are highly anticipated and are used for interoffice contests and even firm-wide competitions and celebrations. Immediately after a report or ranking is emailed out, a barrage of emails is circulated recognizing those with top standings or improvements.

Formal programs keep Kforcers engaged and connected on a monthly and quarterly basis. The most well-known of these is the Performers’ Incentive Program which inspires competition and performance through new, exciting trip destinations each year. Formal qualifications and rankings are developed and communicated via email.  Ranking reports are monthly to show qualifiers their positions. Each year the destination changes to keep the program engaging and exciting. Mission: $2 Billion is the firm-wide campaign that engages associates in our business strategy, collective goals and advantages for the next few years. Kforce developed this theme and uses it for formal recognition programs such as the on-going Cup competition and Quarterly and Annual Awards.

Their formal milestone programs aim to further create a feeling of value and pride for those being recognized.  Kforce service awards recognize those celebrating a 5-, 10-, 15-, 20-, 25- or 30-year anniversary with a firm-wide email and a special desk memento. Their career milestone program is called Moving UP! and recognizes associates who have achieved notable growth in their career. Whether an official promotion (reported by HR) or a sales milestone (reported by Finance), the employees are recognized a monthly firm-wide email.

Whether day-to-day, formal or informal Kforcers are engaged within a strong culture of recognition. It is an obvious differentiator for the firm and the main reason they are all a part of the Kforce Family.

For more information on Kforce, the Chairman’s Awards and their success with Recognition Strategy, please visit the company website at:

Tags:  7 Best Practice Standards  recognition 

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Standard Success Stories: BAE Systems Recognition Strategy

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Friday, January 19, 2018

Note: RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards are the cornerstone of successful employee recognition and rewards programs. In 2018, we are taking a closer look at each of the seven standards and RPI members who have been recognized for their practice of those standards. In the first installment, we take a look at Recognition Strategy, and the award-winning way that BAE Systems practices this standard. The RPI Best Practice Awards are now open for nominations through February 1, 2018.

BAE Systems, based in Arlington, Virginia, was a recipient of three Best in Class awards:

  • Standard 1- Recognition Strategy
  • Standard 4 - Communication Plan
  • Standard 7 - Program Change and Flexibility

BAE Systems takes pride in its recognition strategy programs. From their award-winning entry, they offer several samples of the ideas and actions behind their recognition strategy efforts.

Employees at BAE Systems participate in IMPACT, a company-wide program to recognize and reward employee accomplishments. It is tied to the company’s Total Performance culture and their company values: trusted, innovative and bold. IMPACT’s goal is to make it easy to recognize employees for making an impact on their business.

They measure day-to-day recognition through the IMPACT program. The company’s non-monetary “Rave” award is a special thank you for employees who take on additional responsibilities to help another employee.

Informal recognition is also measured through the IMPACT system via the Pioneer award, which rewards those who have contributed to a team or project or other achievement in a way that aligns to the company’s aforementioned core values. Pioneer awards range in value from $25 to $250 and are based on business-related criteria. The company also offers informal recognition via service anniversaries, birthdays and celebrations like company picnics.

BAE Systems also supports a robust formal recognition program, offering three possible rewards:

  • Pathfinder recipients lead or contribute to a project, program or achievement that aligns t the core values. These awards can range from $500 to $10,000 and are measured through IMPACT.
  • Trailblazer recipients lead a team on a significant project or program with significance that aligns to the company’s core values. These awards can range from $10,000 to $50,000 and are measured through IMPACT.
  • Chairman’s Awards are further broken down into three categories that recognize and celebrate the work of BAE Systems employees in:
    • Business Leader Award
    • Executive Committee Award
    • Chairman’s Gold Award

The basis for all the awards is the core values that BAE Systems identifies and promotes. They seek employee behavior that is:

  • Trusted to deliver on commitments
  • Innovative in finding and turning ideas and technologies into solutions
  • Bold in accepting new challenges and managing risk

The results have shown not only been award from RPI, but in celebration of their awards programs and strategy. For more information on BAE Systems, the Chairman’s Awards and their success with Recognition Strategy, please visit the company culture website at:

Tags:  7 Best Practice Standards  7 Best Practices  recognition strategies  success stories 

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Standard Success Stories: RBC’s Recognition Strategy

Posted By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, January 9, 2018
Untitled Document

Note: RPI’s Seven Best Practice Standards are the cornerstone of successful employee recognition and rewards programs. In 2018, we are taking a closer look at each of the seven standards and RPI members who have been recognized for their practice of those standards. In the first installment, we take a look at Recognition Strategy, and the award-winning way that RBC practices this standard. The RPI Best Practice Awards nominations are now open for nominations through February 1, 2018.

RBC, based in Toronto, was a recipient of the Overall RPI Best Practice® Award in 2017, and is a shining example of how to do recognition strategy right. From their award-winning entry, they offer several samples of the ideas and actions behind their recognition strategy efforts.

All of RBC’s recognition and reward programs under the RBC Performance brand align with their Purpose, Vision and Values to become a leader in financial services wherever in the world they serve customers. That vision and those values help drive their recognition programs and are part of the criteria within the RBC Performance recognition and reward program.

RBC Performance, which is their flagship program, was launched in 1993 as a sales incentive points reward and recognition program and now serves over 75,000 employees. Among the core points of the program are:

  • Day-to-Day Recognition – RBC associates give and receive recognition to and from their peers and from retail branch managers and regional leaders on a regular basis.
  •  InstantThanks – RBC’s social recognition program permits employees so say thanks and send commendation comments and recognition for demonstrating our values and excellent customer service.
  • Branch Huddles – These happen before the bank door opens. Here customer service and product information is given. Managers and team members weave in recognition as often as they can.
  • Informal Recognition – RBC Performance is a comprehensive recognition system dedicated to improving RBC’s financial and service performance results.
  • RBC Performance Nominations and Awards – Employees can recognize individuals and teams who consistently go beyond expectations and make a difference in the business. RBC employees can nominate a colleague or team with RBC Performance’s online nomination feature. Nominations are based on RBC’s values and other key behaviors, and are expected to focus on outstanding performance in these categories. Managers select nominations based on merit and can award point values to send to the employee. The number of nominations and awards received contributes to selecting who attends the RBC Performance Conference.
  • Scratch ‘n Win Cards – Managers can give these cards for on-the-spot recognition. Employees virtually “scratch” a bar online to reveal a point value or the chance to be entered into a monthly draw.
  • Sales Campaigns – Managers in retail banking can recognize and reward employees and teams with points for achieving highest sales or service activities in any quarterly sales campaign.

The company also believes in more formal recognition, with a series of events and awards:

  • Leo Awards – This is RBC’s Academy-award-style celebration event. Employees who showcase the very best in sales, service or support are recognized at a special event during the RBC Performance Conference with “The Leo” Award. Regional leaders select Leo Award recipients from RBC Performance Conference recipients.
  • RBC Performance Conference – This is the best-of-the best annual conference for RBC’s top performers. Each region has a set number of eligible nominees to select. Quarterly Point Award winners are eligible candidates. Regional presidents and senior leaders choose conference attendees from across all roles. Conference winners are announced at each Regional Gala event. Each awardee receives a registration package to attend the Conference.
  • RBC Service Awards – Employees receive a choice of a gift award item on their milestone anniversary at two, five, 10, 15 years and in five-year increments up to 50-year level.

The results have not only been award from RPI, but recognition of RBC as one of the best places to work in Canada. For more information on RBC and their success with Recognition Strategy, please visit the company culture website at:

Tags:  employee engagement  formal recognition  RBC  recognition  recognition strategies  RPI 7 Best Practices  Strategy  success stories  Toronto 

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A Conversation with Outgoing RPI Board Member Rita Maehling

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Tuesday, January 2, 2018
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The New Year will bring changes, as Minnesota-based Rita Maehling is leaving the RPI board – but certainly not leaving the world of recognition professionals – after serving a term-plus. We had a conversation with her about her time with RPI and the industry’s changes over the past nearly two decades.

Tell us a little about when and why you got involved with RPI.

I joined RPI in 2002 when I became an independent consultant. I had a passion around recognition and had actually co-authored a book on the topic in 1990. I wanted to share my experience and continue to work with others, so I was thrilled to find a bevy of like-minded practitioners and service-providers with whom I could learn and contribute.

Initially I was a member at large and then in 2004 I got involved in setting up the certification process. I was a member of the education committee and we presented a proposal to the board which was accepted, to embark on what we now call the Certified Recognition Professional® certification program.

CRP is one of the hallmarks of your time with RPI. How did that start?

I became the instructional designer for the original four courses. That was a paid position that I bid on and was selected. We started with CRP 1 in 2006, then launched CRP 2 in the fall of that year. In 2007 we launched CRP 3 and 4. We selected instructors and continued doing training both at the conference and on-site.

We had lots of opportunity to work with some great people at Rideau and trained 60 of their staff members, which was a huge undertaking for them. We worked with lots of great organizations to bring CRP into their workplaces. It’s been an honor to watch that grow and expand.

Making CRP available online has been a big change. What was your role in that transition?

I served as the project manager on the first conversion of CRP 1 to an online format. Subsequently I worked on all of the online conversions.

It allows people from the comfort of their own home or from their workplace to do self-paced learning and become a Certified Recognition Professional® within probably a third the time of the classroom program.

When did your role on the RPI board start?

I joined the board around 2012 and stayed on for one term, then I filled in for someone who had to roll off the board, so I’ve served for around four years.

I retired from working last year, so I’m kind of scaling down my professional organizational role somewhat. I still plan to remain a member and attend the conference, participating with the education team. I won’t have a leadership role any longer, but I am sure I will be a sideline coach moving forward. From a legacy standpoint, everything is in pretty good shape and people can build on the foundation we started in 2006.

How has the industry changed most significantly during your career?

The technology has been the biggest change, for sure. Everything was paper-based when I started and things were more laborious from an administrative standpoint. The technology has added speed, efficiency and the capability for social media recognition. We’re finding new and great ways to recognize people like internal Facebook pages, for example. Tracking and even fulfillment have changed greatly due to technology. It’s really streamlined and added much ease and capability to the industry.

What are the plusses of serving on the RPI board?

If people are considering a board position, even longer term, I think it’s the best was to leverage your membership, by getting involved in the strategy of the organization. There is such a wealth of knowledge within the board and within the organization itself from myriad perspectives. You have huge organizations like Wells Fargo and Cargill down to the little fish in the big pond. You’ve got government and healthcare and business providers, so everyone brings a different perspective and it really is the melting pot and the pushes all those organizations forward.

From a resume-builder standpoint it looks good to say you’ve been on the board of directors, and it’s great from a professional development standpoint. There are many great benefits to getting more involved.

Tags:  CRP  recognition strategies  RPI board 

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Revamped CRP 1 Now Live for On-Line Learners

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Thursday, December 21, 2017
Untitled Document

The world of employee recognition is constantly changing and evolving, so it makes sense that the renowned education program designed with employee recognition in mind – the popular Certified Recognition Professional® courses – are changing with the times.

It’s that need to be up-to-date and relevant which led to a major revamp of all of the courses in the past year and the final changes to CRP 1 are now complete. Hargrove was part of the team that set to work over the summer remaking CRP 1 – the first of the program’s four sections – and their efforts are now live, having been completed in the late fall.

CRP 1 was the program’s first course, designed to introduce the principles and best practices of recognition. It had gone online several years ago, and after they had revamped CRP 2, 3 and 4, a team led by Rita Maehling and including Hargrove and Dee Hansford felt in order to reflect the new information and new materials included in the newly-developed on-line portion of the program, revisions were needed.

CRP 1 is the foundation for the certification courses. It is an overview method that introduces the entire process. So the revisions ensure that participants are getting the most current thinking in the recognition area.

“We divided and conquered. Dee took the actual on-line slide and I did the learning guide,” Hargrove said of the lengthy and thorough revision project. “She pulled in some existing slides, some slides from the other courses and she also worked with the narration to get the voice talent. Once she had identified the slides’ content, I went through and developed a learning guide to accompany the course.”

The idea was to create a new CRP 1 learning guide that a person can download and use as a reference while they are going through the course and after the course as well. The team included general things like a glossary, references and places where participants can find additional information so that it will be useful beyond just going through the on-line course. It was a necessary change.

“It was not in alignment with the other three courses, and since CRP 1 is the prerequisite for 2, 3 and 4, we wanted to make sure that the information was current and aligned with the new information in 2, 3 and 4,” Hargrove said. “The RPI 7 Best Practices® didn’t change. That’s the standard. But the supporting information and the content that was included in the new 2, 3 and 4 had changed, so we wanted to make sure we were bringing in as current information as we could.”

For example, there are several surveys that different organizations do on an annual and bi-annual basis. They referred to those studies and offered a reference so that people can go back each year and get the newest study information.

And by having the course on-line, people can learn at their own pace, although Hargrove admits there are advantages to both on-line and classroom learning.

“From a participant perspective, on-line courses are certainly more convenient in that you can do it in your own time. The pros are the time commitment, because you can come back to the course, finish a little bit and come back to do more, and you can go over things as many times as you like,” Hargrove said. “In a facilitator-led course you have the advantage of other people who are in a similar position as you, being able to discuss different challenges and how other people handle those challenges.”

She added that the team of Rita, Dee and Vicki did great work together.

“It’s always enjoyable to work with them and get a project done,” Hargrove said. “We hope it will be of value to the participants who are going through CRP. Even if they just take CRP 1 I think it will give them a good foundation of how to organize their own recognition program or how to modify an existing recognition program.”

For more information about the CRP program, please visit CRP 2 and 3 will be offered at the RPI Conference in Nashville in April, 2018.

Tags:  7 Best Practices  Certification  CRP  education  online learning 

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Shuck: EVP explores the optimal way to recognize employees

Posted By By Jess Myers, RPI, Wednesday, November 15, 2017
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If you want to win football games, it’s simple. Just look at what Tom Brady does, and do that. If you want to make money, study what Warren Buffet does, and copy it.

If only life worked that way. It does not.

In his recent webinar hosted by RPI, noted recognition expert and researcher Brad Shuck, PhD, notes that copying the practices of what other successful companies have done to reward and recognize employees doesn’t always work. Your efforts are more successful when they are rooted in principles, not practices.

“Recognition is not about parties or casual Fridays, it is an underlying message of value that tells people they matter,” said Shuck, who is an associate professor of human resources and organization development at the University of Louisville.

In his new RPI-sponsored webinar, entitled “New Rules of Recognition: Moments You Can Leverage,” Shuck tells his audience that successful recognition is less about individual initiatives and more about creating a strong winning workplace culture that can be sustained over time.

“There are lots of ways to recognize employees, but what are the optimal ways to do it?,” he asks early in the presentation, then proceeds to answer his own question.

Shuck believes strongly in the concept of Employee Value Proposition (EVP), which asks why a talented person would choose to work in a given workplace. EVP puts the responsibility on the employer, not the employee, and it strongly encourages not only getting talented people in the door, but keeping them engaged once they are in the door.

He states some important numbers related to EVP, noting that 93 percent of employees who feel recognized and appreciated say they will go above and beyond on behalf of their employer and 91 percent are unlikely to leave.

“EVP breeds and fosters creativity, and encourages employees to give their best ideas,” he said. And creativity is at the heart of his call for a principle-based strategy around employee recognition. It’s easy to look at a renowned company like Google, which famously offers employees three meals per day and has offices with rooms for gaming and napping, but that model is not one that every office can easily or practically replicate.

By objectifying the practices of other companies, Shuck feels you may miss the human element, hence his call for focusing more on principles and establishment of organizational culture rather than focusing on the practices that others use to attract and retain good people.

The full webinar is available free to RPI members in the RPI Learning Center. For more of Dr. Shuck’s insights, his Twitter handle is @drbshuck.

Tags:  culture  engagement  human resources  organization development  recognition principles  recognition research  Shuck  talent development 

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